Eban Lehrer was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. Although very accomplished, he is basically a self-taught artist (he has taken only two formal classes - beginning drawing and beginning painting). Eban's artwork opens a window to the haunting side of a woman's beauty that society often sees as threatening. He has always been interested in the exploration of the boundaries that society imposes arbitrarily. Pushing and challenging these conventions often leads him to new, exciting adventures in art.

 

Eban Lehrer began painting as an adult (as Paul Gauguin did). He is essentially without formal art education, having only taken two basic art classes, a beginning drawing class and a beginning painting class in the continuing education department at Otis/Parsons.

 

I give a tremendous amount of credit to my teacher, Clyde Semler (who taught both classes). He saw that I had something inside me and helped to draw it out (pun intended).

 

Eban started off painting still lives and landscapes. He thought that these genres would be the best to pursue as a potential body of work to sell. He also enjoyed painting the figure and portraiture and did that on the side for himself.

 

I gradually discovered that people were drawn (another pun intended) to my figure work much more so than my still lives and landscapes. It became apparent to me that I should pursue the portraiture and figurative works wholeheartedly as my enthusiasm for the subject matter was manifest in the work. One important aspect of my work has evolved into an exploration of a strange dichotomy found in this society: the wanton acceptance of violence versus the censorship of the human body in its natural state (nude).

 

Creativity seems to run in his genes Ė his mother painted, his grandmother painted, his father wrote, his uncle sculpted and many other relatives are involved in the creative arts.

 

I didnít really do much art as a child. It never occurred to me that that would be something that would hold my interest. I thought I would be a race car driver or a scientist when I grew up. As an adult, when I took that drawing class on a lark, it seemed as if a dim light inside me began to grow brighter. As I continued on in the painting class and beyond, it began to shine. It was as if something that was always inside of me was finally growing.

 

The times Eban has been forced to take a hiatus from painting have helped him understand the meaning of art in his life.

 

I had stopped painting temporarily to deal with some personal matters, and after a couple of months, I began to feel uneasy. Nothing I could really put my finger on, just something did not feel right. This went away when I went back to my art. Some years later, I had to take another hiatus from art and this time, when I was hit with the same feeling, I realized that art was an integral part of my life.

 

Eban paints from life.

 

There is something that is very important about having a real person sitting for a painting. I have tried painting from a photograph in the past and it just not the same. The light is flat. When there is a human being across from me, light flows around the person. I feel the presence of the person. It imbues the painting with a spark of life from the individual who is there. It makes the picture much more real to me.

 

Eban has been influenced by many artists, among them Klimt, Dali, Van Gogh, Magritte, Picasso, and Freud. One of his strongest influences is Egon Schiele.

 

I have always admired the emotion in Schieleís paintings. One of the greatest accolades I have received is having someone say that my work reminds them of Egon Schieleís.

 

Ebanís work has been seen in a myriad of venues and has even been used in a movie.

 

I find it a great compliment that, even though I am a man, my art work was chosen to represent the work of a female erotic artist in the movie "Click: For the Love of the Click".

 

Eban has exhibited in many local and national galleries, from Los Angeles, California to Las Vegas, Nevada to New York City, New York. He has two pieces in the permanent collection of the Museu de l' Erotica in Barcelona, Spain.